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Warner Hospital and Health Services are playing a waiting game to get their planned improvements started within the facility.

 

The city-owned facility is planning to move their billing department to 70 Clinton Plaza, behind KFC but CEO Paul Skowron indicates they are waiting for fiber to be installed there so they can have internet connectivity.

 

 

Improvements to the emergency room and relocation of the pharmacy are a few of the plans the hospital is waiting on for approval from the State of Illinois. Skowron says once they get the 'thumbs up', they'll get those going.

 

 

The pharmacy project has had a new development recently. In recent interviews on Regional Radio News, Skowron has indicated that the project had a completion date requirement of the end of the year but the requirement has been modified.

 

 

The drive of the hospital has undergone a recent redo as well. Skowron indicates their circle drive and an area near family medicine will be taken care of. It will be touch-ups of some work that was done earlier. 


Census Could Impact Community Action

The State of Illinois has invested millions of dollars into making sure everyone in the state participates in the 2020 census. While millions of dollars are unavailable to a central Illinois non-profit, one is taking the census just as seriously. 

 

Community Action has grant funding and other sources of revenue that depend on getting an accurate count of residents locally. Wednesday Morning on the WHOW Morning Show, Executive Director Alison Rumler-Gomez explained funding is divided up based on the percent of the population in certain areas.

 

 

To make sure seniors and low-income residents get their information in for the census, Rumler-Gomez says they are planning some outreach measures.

 

 

Funding getting cut would mean one thing - a reduction in services. Rumler-Gomez says Community Action could, and would, certainly reach out and seek more private funding to help supplement any losses of revenue.

 

 

According to Rumler-Gomez, around 80-percent of Community Action's funding comes from state and federal dollars. Any decrease in that would increase their reliance on fundraising and private partnerships. 


Blue Ridge Names New Superintendent

Dr. Hillary Stanifer has been named the Superintendent of Blue Ridge Schools and the Board of Education is expected to approve her at their board meeting next Wednesday.

 

Dr. Stanifer is in her third year as curriculum coordinator in the district and will take over the position July 1, 2020, for retiring Superintendent Susan Wilson. 

 

Dr. Stanifer previously served ten years as assistant principal and principal of Liberty Middle School in Edwardsville, IL and taught mathematics at both the high school and middle school levels. Just before coming to Blue Ridge, she was Assistant Principal at Garden Hills in Champaign for one year. 


Enjoy a fun night of trivia, light food and drinks and support the youth of the community this Saturday in Clinton.

 

Write Stuff for Kids is hosting a trivia fundraiser at The Abigail Saturday night for their recently formed scholarship. Edith Brady-Lunny says competition gets underway at 6 pm.

 

 

Helen Michelassi came up with the questions and feels she has a good variety of topics for their competitors. She says it was quite an undertaking to come up with all those questions but feels there is a good variety of topics and questions. 

 

 

Write Stuff began a scholarship last year and Brady-Lunny says this allows them to help kids that are pursuing education past high school. She notes, the fundraiser helps them supplement the scholarship for a student who is attending Richland Community College.

 

 

The cost is $20 per person for Saturday's trivia fundraiser at the Abigail in Clinton. The trivia competition starts at 6 pm. Get more information by visiting the Write Stuff for Kids Facebook page or visiting writestuffforkids.com. 


Chicago is the most corrupt city in America and Illinois ranks as the 3rd most corrupt state in the nation, according to a University of Illinois study conducted early this year. Now, the cost of that corruption is coming to light. Amy Corte is with the Illinois Policy Institute has been crunching the numbers…

 

 

Only New York and California ranked higher than Illinois in the most corrupt state list.


The Illinois House Wednesday gave approval to legislation consolidating the 649 existing local police and fire pension funds:

 

The bill is intended to boost the financial security of the largely-underfunded pension systems. Currently, each one is a separate fund with its own board of trustees and its own administrative staff, including investment managers. By consolidating them into two funds, supporters say the funds could generate upwards of $1 billion a year in additional earnings because they would have the flexibility to diversify their investments and to invest in more kinds of instruments. Consolidation would also greatly reduce the funds’ combined administrative costs, potentially saving local taxpayers millions of dollars per year.

 

The Illinois Municipal League also supports the pension consolidation plan contained in Senate Bill 1300. The legislation was approved by the House of Representatives by a vote of 96-14-3. State Representative Dan Brady of Normal voted in favor of the legislation and explained his yes vote following the debate.

 

 

According to most recently available estimates, Illinois’ 649 downstate and suburban police and fire pension funds are underfunded by a whopping $11 billion.

 

The idea for consolidation came from the Governor’s bipartisan Pension Consolidation Feasibility Task Force that met eight times throughout the last year and issued a report in October recommending that downstate police and fire pension system assets be consolidated to achieve higher investment returns and lower the cost of managing the funds.


A CONSOLIDATION BILL FOR MUNICIPAL FIRE AND POLICE PENSIONS CLEARED THE HOUSE WEDNESDAY.

 

THE MEASURE MOVES THE STATE’S 649 SEPARATE POLICE AND FIRE PENSION SYSTEMS INTO JUST TWO…ONE FOR POLICE AND ONE FOR FIRE. REPRESENTATIVE JAY HOFFMAN OF BELLEVILLE SAYS THIS WILL REALLY HELP TO PROP UP THE LARGELY UNDERFUNDED PENSIONS.

 

 

REPRESENTATIVE ROBYN GABEL SAYS THIS WILL BE A RELIEF TO LOCAL GOVERNMENTS STRUGGLING TO FUND PENSIONS.

 

 

IT’S ESTIMATED CONSOLIDATING LOCAL PENSIONS WILL GENERATE 820 MILLION TO TWO AND A HALF BILLION DOLLARS IN ENHANCED RETURNS OVER THE NEXT FIVE YEARS. THE BILL NOW MOVES TO THE SENATE.

 

HOFFMAN SAYS THIS WILL ALSO GREATLY REDUCE ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS…SINCE EACH PENSION SYSTEM HAS THEIR OWN BOARD. THE BILL NOW MOVES TO THE SENATE.


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